Daily Bible Verse

February 25, 2011

Warmer Weather and Hot Fishing around the area waters; Spring Time!






Wow, what a difference some warm weather makes on fishing! This has been some of the best February weather I’ve ever seen around southeast North Carolina in a very long time! The great thing it has really gotten the fish moving and starting to feed some around the local waters. And that’s what I’m going to go over in this fishing report.

I love saltwater fishing but, I like any kind of fish pulling on my line salt or fresh and this time of year you can catch some really nice fresh water fish. I have run a few fresh water trips in the last few weeks with some pretty good success; we even got a few very nice bass on a fly rod early last week that went just over six pounds. Fishing local lakes, ponds and the Northeast Cape Fear River has been producing good catches of large-mouth bass. The best baits lately have been Berkley Powerbait 5” Sinkworms in colors green pumpkin/watermelon, black with red flake and watermelon. I’m rigging these worms Texas and wacky style on 4/0 wide gap worm hooks. When we are casting the fly rod we are using; six to eight weight rods with floating line and eight to twelve pound tippets.

One fish that has just been waiting for the water to warm up just a bit is the good’ole Redfish; they are on the move and biting! We are seeing the Reds on the shallow mud and oyster flats now in good numbers. Capt Jeff Wolfe and I gave it a shot last week and ended up with just over forty-five Redfish for the day. All the Reds hit Berkley Gulp 3” shrimp in colors natural and molting on 1/8oz and 1/4oz jig heads with twenty pound Stren tinted tannic fluorocarbon leader. There have been a few schools of Reds around the local inlets and just off the beaches if we can get the weather to go get them!

The Cape Fear River Stripers are biting from time to time; it got a little cold for them but with this nice warm up they should start biting. The Stripers are hitting Berkley gulp jerk shad 5” in colors pearl, new penny and electric chicken. We rig the jerk shad Texas style, with a large 5/0 worm hook. Rapala X-raps work too, in colors glass ghost and green back. Remember, still work the lures slow for the water is warming up but it’s still a little cold.

I would like to thank everyone who has attended the fishing schools, seminars and boat shows I’ve spoke at this winter, it always good to see everyone. There have been some very good seminars/schools this winter and the turnouts have been great, thanks again for attending. If anyone has any questions about any of the classes I spoke at, please feel free to e-mail the questions any time to captainjot@yahoo.com There are a few more good fishing functions you can attend this spring, here are a few more I’ll be at in the near feature.

February 26th and 27th Bass Pro Shop 2011 Spring Fishing Classic, Myrtle Beach, SC. I’ll be answering any questions you have about products made by Penn, Spidwire, Berkley, Fenwick, Minn Kota, MirrOlure and many others you want to purchase at this sale. Bass Pro is also offering there Reel Trade-Ins program for you to save money on your new reels purchased from Bass Pro.

March 26th: Tex’s Tackle Spring Sale and Fishing Seminars. Yes it’s that time of year again Tex’s big spring sale, Tex will have all kinds of good deals on tackle to get you started for this upcoming fishing season. I’ll be to help you with any questions you have about tackle and I’ll also being doing a seminar or two on inshore fishing.

*If you know any one or your looking for a Bay boat my 2008 Ranger Bay 2200 is for sale please look at this link for all the info on this well maintained Ranger. http://www.boattrader.com/listing/2008-Ranger-2200-Bay-97953352 If you have any questions or would like to see/test drive please let me know.

Fishing gear I use:

Gear used: Redfish, Bass and Striped Bass: reels Penn Conquer 2000 and Battle 2000 & 3000 spinning reels. Fenwick HMG GS 70M-MF for Redfish, Bass and Striped Bass. Line: Spiderwire Ultracast ten and fifth teen pound. Fluorocarbon leader material, Stren Tinted Fluorocarbon in tints Gunsmoke for clearer waters and Tannic for river or stained waters in thirty pound for Redfish and Striped Bass.

Thanks for reading, hope to see you at a boat show or fishing seminar this winter; please come by and say hello.

Captain Jot Owens
Ranger Boats Pro Staff
Penn Reels Elite Staff
www.captainjot.com
910-233-4139

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February 22, 2011

Posting

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Hello from beautiful Topsail Island. Folks, Sorry I haven't posted in a while. My health hasn't been too good. I am praying I will be back out in no time, and the posts will continue. We have had some beautiful weather the last couple of days, and I am told the water temps are in the low 50's. I do know that the black drum are being caught around bridges and docks in and near the ICW, so if you have access, you can get some for supper.


Creole Black Drum

2 lbs black drum fillets
3 tomatoes, chopped
1 small onion, chopped
½ green pepper, chopped
1 tablespoon lemon juice
Cayenne pepper to taste
3 tablespoons butter
olive oil

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Melt the butter in a small sauce pan. Coat a large baking dish with olive oil and lay fillets inside it. Top black drum with remaining ingredients and pour butter over dish. Bake 15-20 minutes until fish is done. Great with wild rice. Serves 4-5.


Till next time....
Tight lines!
Johnny

February 14, 2011

Stripers in Oregon Inlet

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Hello from beautiful downtown Topsail Beach! What a great day is was today. Sun out, started out a bit cool and breezy, but after noon warmed up quite a bit. Went for a nice walk on the beach with my Donna. I am so ready for Spring and warm weather. I have my fishing rods cleaned and ready, Tackle box organized, ready, but I may have to get another box. I am short on a lot of tackle. I lost a lot last year on hang ups and broken line. I need to replace some got-cha plugs, mirro-lures, a couple hundred dollars in gulp saltwater, (not really, but a lot), and my box is already full. For the last couple of years I have used smaller more specialized boxes. You know what I am talking about, one box for gulp, grubs, and jig heads. One box for mirro-lures and hard baits. Another box for bottom fishing.  I don't think I really like this system. This year I'm going back to one box. It's going to have be a big one. But I think I will like it better.

Now, to the fishing reports!

Anglers who venture out are still catching some nice big stripers out of Oregon Inlet. Reports are the boats in the parking lots have thinned out a bit so the traffic isn't quite so bad. There is room to fish now without running into another boat or getting tangled with another line when you have a fish on. I am also getting some reports of red drum out in Brunswick Co and in northern South Carolina. Try jig heads with gulp shrimp or swimming mullet. I am hearing some anglers are getting good results with jig heads and mud minnows also. Just like all winter long, fish slow and use light weight jigs, most are using 1/4 oz. I also received one report of a few black drum at the 172 bridge. They were caught on frozen mullet. This is third hand info, and unconfirmed. The charter boats Rock Solid and Carolina Blue fishing off the Outer Banks had a couple of good days Friday and Saturday. They jigged up a couple of stripers that tipped the scales at 53 and 47 pounds. Those were the big ones. There were other stripers caught, most over 35 lbs. Fin-Nagle charter reported his charter landed a 41 pounder and a 20 pounder, nice fish but thats all they could catch this trip. Last years trip with the same couple produced over 40 fish in one day! I guess that's why they call the sport "fishing" and not "catching."


Sorry folks, local reports still hard to find.

Till next time....
tight lines!
Johnny

This is the day that the Lord has made; let us rejoice and be glad in it.

Psalm 118:24

February 11, 2011

North Carolina’s Ocean Fishing Piers by Al Baird

Hello from Topsail Beach! This post is to celebrate the release of a book written by our friend Al Baird about a topic that is dear to the heart of almost everyone I know. Fishing Piers on the North Carolina coast. As we all know, these childhood memories are quickly becoming lost to soaring property values along our coast which is making it practially impossible for these piers, most of which have been family owned for generations to remain in business. Al has been successful in saving these memories, and indeed, maybe even some of these piers. I know we will all enjoy this book. I for one, already have a copy reserved. If you get one from Al's website, or one of his book signings, which will be annonced soon, you can get an autographed copy, which I plan to do. Thanks Al, and Thanks to all our readers for your support.



North Carolina’s Ocean Fishing Piers

From Kitty Hawk to Sunset Beach
Al Baird


From the sweltering summer heat to the biting winter chill, thousands of dedicated anglers flock to North Carolina’s piers to cast lines into the salty depths, hoping to reel in anything from whiting and shark to the highly prized sheepshead, red drum and even the elusive king mackerel. Fishing pier enthusiast Al Baird recounts the history of these windworn structures, from the incredible story of the oldest pier in North Carolina to the tales of the destructive hurricanes that ripped through the Outer Banks. Discover how seaside towns have grown and changed while their piers remain the same, as Baird recounts the memories and accomplishments of the men and women who have visited and loved these slowly disappearing landmarks.


Media review copies, high-resolution photographs and interviews available upon request.

Al Baird resides in Fort Mill, South Carolina, with his wife, Mary, and their two children, Katie and Chris. He began fishing the North Carolina coast as a child in the 1960s when his family would go on their annual family vacation there. Jennette’s Pier was the first pier he ever fished. In 2005, he started the North Carolina Fishing Pier Society to promote pier fishing in the state. In 2006 and 2007, he conducted a weeklong fishing pier marathon, during which he fished every pier in the state. In 2008, he co-founded, with Mike Marsh, the North Carolina Public Access Foundation, a nonprofit organization that is dedicated to preserving access to North Carolina’s natural resources.

The book will be available in March 2011. Signed copies can be purchased at www.ncfps.com   If you would like to schedule an interview with the author, please contact Dan Watson at 843.577.5971, ext 114 or dan.watson@historypress.net 

ISBN: 978-1-60949-148-2 • Paperback • 128 pages • $14.99 • 2011




February 10, 2011

Save the Most Important Fish in the Sea

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A reprint from


Click the link to read the article on The Public Trust Project website.
Save the Most Important Fish in the Sea


January 20 2011
Alison Fairbrother



The Menhaden is a small forage fish whose significance to our planet is remarkably disproportionate to its tiny size. Known as “the most important fish in the sea,” menhaden filter our waters and provide forage for the majority of the fish species that flourish along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts.

But the most important fish in the sea is in danger of disappearing.

The systematic slaughter of menhaden is the industrial fisheries’ best-kept secret. Menhaden are the principal fish caught along the Atlantic coast, exceeding the tonnage of all other species combined.

Millions of pounds of menhaden are removed annually from our waters by Omega Protein, a company that grinds up menhaden to sell as fish meal and pet food. The population of Atlantic Menhaden has been reduced to a devastatingly low number.

Scientists are seeing troubling patterns emerge as a result of the loss, including severely malnourished species of saltwater fish that normally feed on them. Striped bass, tuna, cod, bluefish, swordfish, salmon, redfish, mahi mahi, king mackerel, and many other species depend on menhaden for food.

Menhaden themselves are at the bottom of the food chain, feeding on phytoplankton, and filtering huge amounts of algae, nitrogen, and plant detritus from our estuaries. They clean our waters at an incredible rate—some scientists have put the figure as high as four gallons a minute per adult fish!

In sum, menhaden are a keystone species. But they have been consistently overfished for more than a century. Menhaden used to teem in our waters, shoals of them 40 miles long and two miles wide, from the surface to the sea-bed. The menhaden was the fish Squanto taught the Pilgrims to plant with corn in the 17th century. Menhaden was used to fertilize our depleted soils the century after. Eventually menhaden supplemented whaling and whale oil when that fishery was depleted (for the most part) by the 1880s.


But it wasn’t until decades of industrial fishing at the hands of Omega Protein that the menhaden population became decimated as an industrialized product used as fertilizer and animal feed.

Omega Protein maintains that the public can’t do without what they supply — that our cat food costs will go through the roof, that our chickens would cost an arm and a leg, and that we would have no fish oil pills to pop. But all menhaden do is save us pennies. Other commodities, such as soybeans and waste products from the processing of oily fish food can provide what menhaden offer.

The ecosystem services that the menhaden provide to our waters are fundamental and irreplaceable. Saving the menhaden means filtering our estuaries—currently laden with algae blooms and dead zones—and making strides toward restoring our cod, striped bass, salmon, and tuna fisheries.



Lets get involved!
Till next time....
Tight lines!
Johnny and Donna

February 7, 2011

Does an MFC member have a conflict of interest in the striper trawler debate?

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Hello from Topsail Beach!  Well, This ol fat man for one is read for spring. I can hear the sand and surf callin my name. I walked over to the beach this morning during a rare lull in the rain, and I think I'm ready for some fishing. Oh yea, I'm ready! Here's more on the striper problems we are having off our coast. We need to get this resolved.

A Story by Jeffrey Weeks

Charlotte Fish and Wildlife Policy Examiner
The NC Marine Fisheries Committee (MFC) is meeting next weekend, and one of the issues that will be brought up for discussion is the recent striped bass kills by the trawler boats operating off the Outer Banks. I have written a series of articles about these kills, in which both legal and undersized striped bass appeared to be discarded dead as the trawlers practice “culling” and bring home bigger fish worth more money.
The result of these operations have been miles-long wakes of wasted dead stripers, and the depressing response from the state government has been that this apparently happens all the time. The only difference is that this year the kills were close enough to be photographed and videoed.
The Division of Marine Fisheries (DMF) has chosen to open the fishery up twice since the first mass kill was reported. However, those actions are now subject to the MFC so that at least there is hope that something can be done about this outrageous wasteful practice of killing all these big striped bass.
Here’s where we run into a little problem. We want the MFC to take action to stop the striper waste in the trawl fishery. But can we expect a fair hearing on this?
Mikey Daniels is a commercial waterman who manages the Wanchese Fish Company. He sits on the MFC as a voting member, and has debated and voted about these issues in the past. I have also been told that he has a direct financial interest in the trawl fishery and owns one of the striper trawlers that participates in it.

You can see where I would be concerned. So I asked MFC Chairman Rob Bizzell about this apparent conflict of interest. This was Mr. Bizzell’s response:

“I understand, from an indirect source,” said Mr. Bizzell, “that he has one trawler that could participate in that fishery. Whether or not he participates in the fishery, I do not know. Mikey, like all Commissioners, must decide if their vote and participation on the Commission will result in a direct monetary gain. If so, they must recuse themselves. As I do with all Commissioners, I trust Mikey to make the right decision.”

I sent an email to Mr. Daniels asking about this, but did not get a reply. Please understand that I don’t think anyone has done anything wrong…yet. But, I really can’t quite wrap my mind around the idea of a striper trawler boat owner debating and voting as a government official on what the regulations for his own vessel should be.

I noticed that in the press release the DMF put out about the upcoming MFC meeting a paragraph was added at the bottom which goes right to the heart of these matters. This is what it said:


Executive Order 34 orders that in transacting board business, each person appointed by the governor shall act always in the best interest of the pubic without regard for her or his financial interests. To this end, each appointee must recuse herself or himself from voting on any matter on which the appointee has a financial interest. Commissioners having questions about a conflict of interest or appearance of conflict should consult with counsel to the Marine Fisheries Commission or the secretary’s ethics liaison. Upon discovering a conflict consistent with Executive Order 34, the commissioner should inform the chair of the commission in accordance with N.C.G.S. 138A-15(e).

I guess we will just have to wait and see if MFC member Mikey Daniels recuses himself from voting on the striped bass trawler issue or not. If he does, then I guess it isn’t an issue. If he doesn’t, then I hope the chairman’s trust is warranted.
Continue reading on Examiner.com: Does an MFC member have a conflict of interest in the striper trawler debate? - Charlotte Fish and Wildlife Policy
Examiner.com http://www.examiner.com/fish-and-wildlife-policy-in-charlotte/does-an-mfc-member-have-a-conflict-of-interest-the-striper-trawler-debate?CID=examiner_alerts_article#ixzz1DKpaEe9R


For more Carolina fishing articles see my blog A Dash of Salty and my website Surf and Salt.


Till next time....
Tight line!
Johnny

February 5, 2011

A Few Things For Young People to Think About

Hello from Topsail Beach. It's cold with a drizzle this morning. It's rained all night and there's a good size fresh water "pond" in the yard which I'm calling Lake Topsail. It's going to be a good day to sip some coffee, listen to some Delta Blues, and watch the gulls bathe in the fresh water. Drives our dogs crazy, especially Sonny, our rat terrier. He thinks the gulls don't belong in Topsail Beach, or in the Northern Hemisphere for that matter. The pond is starting to look quite "fishy." I may sneak out there if the rain quits and see if there's a largemouth lurking around the cedars in the corner of the yard. Just maybe ........

Psalm 118:24
This is the day that the Lord has made; let us rejoice and be glad in it.


This little clip kind of touched me this morning, I don't know what good, if any it may do for any young person who may see it. I just know teen aged kids are faced with chanenges today that I am not sure I could have overcome when I was in my teens. I am sure I could not have faced them if it were not for my family. I knew I could always count on them. Thanks, I love you all.





Till next time....
Tight lines!
Johnny

February 4, 2011

US Fish & Wildlife Service Confirms NC Commercial Trawlers Discarding Big, Legal Striped Bass

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Hello from Topsail Beach! Hello everyone. You may be getting tired of seeing this story on www.fishintopsail.com, but this is important to the future of our sport. Too long has criminal activities like this been alowed to go on by the powers that be in our state fisheries departments. It has got to stop!

Another story update by Jeffrey Weeks. This guy has some good and reliable sources.

Read the original post here.
Jeffrey Weeks, Yahoo! Contributor Network

Government agencies are investigating the latest striped bass kill off of Oregon Inlet by commercial trawlers and the results seem to indicate that the trawlers are culling not only undersized stripers but big, legal sized fish. Thousands of these large stripers are being killed and discarded so that trawlers can keep even larger fish.

Some of the dead stripers have begun washing up on the beaches of the Outer Banks as part of a grotesque man made fish kill.

The NC Division of Marine Fisheries (DMF) has admitted the actions of the trawlers are "indicative of culling" and suggested that 60 percent of the fish the Marine Patrol collected were under the legal size limit of 28 inches.

However, according to John Ellis of the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) federal officials surveyed the beaches of Pea Island National Wildlife Refuse this morning and saw a different scene.

"Twenty one dead striped bass were found," Ellis said. "Three were under the minimum size limit for possession by recreational and commercial fishermen. The majority of the fish were around 30" and the largest was 44."

Despite the fact that the trawlers are clearly culling and killing legal sized stripers and simply discarding them, the striped bass trawl fishery was reopened yesterday and today. The DMF has made the decision to open the fishery twice since the first massive striped bass kill occurred.

The actions of the DMF are expected to be reviewed by the NC Marine Fisheries Commission (MFC) at their meeting in Pine Knoll Shores Feb 11.

February 3, 2011

Commercial Trawlers Kill Thousands More Stripers Off the NC Outer Banks

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Breaking news by Jeffrey Weeks; award-winning North Carolina newspaper columnist. Thanks to Jeffrey for his relentless persuit for truth and accountability in our NC Dept of Marine Fisheries. Click here to read the original post at examiner.com.

Taking advantage of a NC Division of Marine Fisheries (DMF) decision to allow them back into the ocean, commercial striped bass trawlers off of Oregon Inlet again killed and discarded thousands of striped bass today in a tragic and wasteful repeat of last month’s fish kill.

Despite the massive striped bass kill last month, DMF director Dr. Louis Daniel reopened the ocean trawler striper season and once again the commercial trawlers left a miles-long trail of wasted, dead stripers.

“There are thousands of discarded striped bass covering an area approximately 1-1 ½ miles wide and 3-5 miles long,” said one eyewitness observer who flew over the fish kill in a helicopter. “There is no disputing the fact that these fish came from the trawler fleet as there were no other boats in the area.”

Most recreational boats were not fishing out of Oregon Inlet today due to heavy winds and swells. But one charter captain who did make it to the area described the size of the fish left dead in the wake of the trawlers.

“These were not undersized fish we are talking about,” he said. “We picked up discarded striped bass up to 34 pounds.”

Just weeks ago a huge striped bass kill brought howls of protest from recreational and small commercial fishermen to the DMF, which attempted to blame much of the problem on a single overloaded net from one trawler.


After that the DMF changed the law which limited striped bass trawlers to 50 fish in response to public pressure and media reports detailing trawlers throwing thousands of striped bass, many of legal size in the 15 to 20 pound range, back into the ocean in order to keep larger fish.

The DMF did not close the fishery, however, and allowed the trawlers back into the ocean under the new rules. They were allowed out again today and will go back tomorrow.

The rule change has not eliminated the massive discard of dead striped bass, and once again we have a field of senseless waste and destruction littered in the ocean while the government does nothing.

You can visit the contact page for the NC DMF here.

Join me as a concerned sportsman and demand ACTION from our representatives so this senseless waste of our natural resource no longer occurs in our waters. Thank you for your concern and action.

Till next time....
Tight lines!
Johnny

PROCLAMATION: STRIPED BASS SEASON – OCEAN TRAWL: ATLANTIC OCEAN

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Striped bass season-ocean trawl atlantic ocean ff-21-2011

FF-21-2011

PROCLAMATION

RE: STRIPED BASS SEASON – OCEAN TRAWL: ATLANTIC OCEAN

Dr. Louis B. Daniel III, Director of Marine Fisheries, hereby announces that effective at 12:01 A.M., Thursday, February 3, 2011, the season for the harvest of striped bass with ocean trawls in the Atlantic Ocean waters of North Carolina SHALL OPEN. The following restrictions will apply:

I. SIZE LIMIT

No person may possess, transport, buy, sell, or offer for sale striped bass less than 28 inches total length taken with ocean trawls from the Atlantic Ocean.

II. HARVEST RESTRICTIONS

A. It is unlawful to take or possess striped bass from the Atlantic Ocean in a trawl operation without having an Atlantic Ocean Striped Bass Commercial Gear Permit designated for the trawl fishery.

B. It is unlawful for an Atlantic Ocean Striped Bass Commercial Gear Permit for trawl holder to land or sell more than 2,000 pounds of striped bass per vessel, per day, regardless of the number of permit holders on board, during the harvest period beginning at 12:01 A.M., Thursday, February 3, 2011 and ending at 6:00 P.M. Friday, February 4, 2011.

C. Vessels with an Atlantic Ocean Striped Bass Commercial Permit designated for trawls may transfer up to 2,000 pounds of striped bass to another vessel with the trawl permit in the Atlantic Ocean seaward of the COLREG Demarcation lines (see VIII.F) at the inlets.

D. It is unlawful for an Atlantic Ocean Striped Bass Commercial Gear Permit for trawls holder to possess more than 2,000 pounds of striped bass in internal waters.

III. GEAR RESTRICTIONS

A. For purposes of this proclamation, a trawl is defined as a net made of multi-strand nylon consisting of wings, a body and a codend.

B. No gill nets may be possessed on board a vessel used in the taking or landing of striped bass.

IV. LANDING RESTRICTIONS

Striped bass harvested in this fishery may only be sold to and purchased by a currently licensed finfish dealer possessing a valid 2010/2011 Atlantic Ocean Dealer’s Striped Bass Permit.

V. DEALER PERMITS

A. No finfish dealer may possess, buy, sell or offer for sale striped bass taken from the Atlantic Ocean without first obtaining a 2010/2011 STRIPED BASS DEALER PERMIT validated for the Atlantic Ocean from the N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries. Dealers must abide by all conditions of the STRIPED BASS DEALER PERMIT and the general permit conditions found in NC Marine Fisheries Rule 15A NCAC 03O .0503.

B. Only a STRIPED BASS DEALER PERMIT validated for the Atlantic Ocean may be used for transactions involving striped bass taken from the area opened by this proclamation.

C. Striped bass lawfully sold to a permitted dealer may be resold to a non-permitted wholesale or retail market provided the initial permitted dealer records their dealer identification number on each bill of lading or receipts involved in the shipment of striped bass. Any individual or corporation who holds a current finfish dealer license must obtain a STRIPED BASS DEALER PERMIT validated for the Atlantic Ocean in order to sell any striped bass personally harvested.

VI. SALE TAGS

No finfish dealer may possess, buy, sell or offer for sale striped bass taken from the Atlantic Ocean without having affixed either a North Carolina Division of Marine Fisheries-issued Atlantic Ocean striped bass sale tag affixed through the mouth and gill cover or, in the case of striped bass imported from other states, a similar tag that is issued for striped bass in the state of origin.

VII. SEASON CLOSURE

The ocean trawl season for striped bass WILL CLOSE at 6:00 P.M., February 4, 2011 unless closed earlier by proclamation when the harvest quota is met.

VIII. GENERAL INFORMATION

A. This proclamation is issued under the authority of N.C.G.S. 113-170.4; 113-170.5; 113-182; 113-221.1; 143B-289.52; and N.C. Marine Fisheries Rules 15A NCAC 03H .0103, 03M .0201; 03M .0204; and 03O .0500 et.seq.

B. It is unlawful to violate the provisions of any proclamation issued by the Director under his delegated authority pursuant to N.C. Marine Fisheries Rule 15A NCAC 03H .0103.

C. The intent of this proclamation is to allow the commercial harvest of striped bass from the Atlantic Ocean by traditional gears within the 480,480 pound quota established for the 2010/2011 season by the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission Fishery Management Plan for Striped Bass.

D. Federal regulation 50 CFR 697.7 (b) prohibits anyone from fishing for, harvesting, or possessing Atlantic striped bass in the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ).

E. The waters of the Atlantic Ocean, as applicable to this proclamation are defined as waters seaward of the COLREGS Demarcation Lines as indicated on National Ocean Service navigation charts for the areas to which this proclamation applies.

F. Atlantic Ocean Striped Bass Commercial Gear Permits were to have been Purchased prior to November 1, 2010.

G. Permits may be obtained from all North Carolina Marine Fisheries License offices.

H. All striped bass taken during season closures and all undersized striped bass shall be immediately returned to the waters where taken, regardless of the condition of the fish.

I. Hook-and-line fishing equipment is not commercial fishing equipment in the striped bass fishery and it is illegal to sell or purchase striped bass taken by hook-and-line in accordance with N.C. Marine Fisheries Rule 15A NCAC 03M .0201(b).

J. Holders of Recreational Commercial License or hook-and-line fishermen must follow the bag and restrictions of the recreational fishery for striped bass.

K. Dealers whose businesses are located in Beaufort, Carteret, Craven and Pamlico counties may obtain tags by contacting the Morehead City Marine Patrol Office at 1-800-682-2632 or (252) 726-7021. Dealers whose businesses are located in Hyde, Dare, Tyrrell, Washington, Bertie, Chowan, Pasquotank, Camden, Hertford and other northern counties may obtain tags by contacting the Columbia Marine Patrol at 1-800-405-7774 or (252) 796-1322. Allow 48 hours for delivery.


Till next time....
Tight lines!
Johnny

Eric Clapton Drifting Blues 2008 Unplugged Live TV Recording



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Jolly Roger Inn and Fishing Pier, Topsail Beach, North Carolina

Do you know the current North Carolina size and catch limits?
Find out here 2010 NC Recreational Coastal Waters Guide

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February 1, 2011

SAFMC at it again. This time Sea Bass

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The South Atlantic Fisheries Marine Council




The South Atlantic Fisheries Marine Council is at it again. This time it's Sea Bass.

Theo Jansen's Strandbeests - Wallace & Gromit's World of Invention Episo...




This is fascinating! Proves one thing. There are people in this world a whole lot smarter than me! I love stuff like this! I wonder how I could attach a fishing rod to this thing. Maybe do a little trolling. And an attachment to pick up trash while it's strolling down the beach! Ok, I need to get to work on that.
Till next time....
tight lines!
Johnny




Check out our Facebook Message Board Over 350 members and growing!

Jolly Roger Inn and Fishing Pier, Topsail Beach, North Carolina

Do you know the current North Carolina size and catch limits?
Find out here 2010 NC Recreational Coastal Waters Guide

Make a Comment? Read Comments?
Click on the COMMENTS button on bottom of this post.

Check out our Facebook Message Board Over 350 members and growing!

Jolly Roger Inn and Fishing Pier, Topsail Beach, North Carolina

Do you know the current North Carolina size and catch limits?
Find out here 2010 NC Recreational Coastal Waters Guide

Make a Comment? Read Comments?
Click on the COMMENTS button on bottom of this post.

Hello from Topsail Beach! Where we have a little more sand now than we did a week ago thanks to the guys pumping a sixty - forty mix of sand and water from the icw to the dunes. Seems like slow progress, but they are building up the dunes. The weather is cold one day, warm the next. I for one, am ready for spring. I have most of my fishing gear ready to go, except for my cart, another wheel fell off today. I keep patching her up, but it may be time for another one. I love the old "Wonder Wheeler!" Easy to roll up and down steps, great for the pier, good all around cart. But nothing last forever. Might try one of those aluminium carts this time. Haven't decided. OK people. Here's my report.

Report from NCAngler.com

Fishing report from the boat "StormCatcher" out of Bogue Inlet 01/30/11


Catchin' dawgs out of Bogue Inlet 01/30/11
Today was a day of high expectations for loading the boat with the lowly dog fish. It was a beautiful day. Got the latest info on Bogue Inlet from my trusty neighbor so getting out of the inlet was smooth. We left the dock about 7a.m. It was a little steep going out (although no big waves), so we made about 20knts going out to our first loc about 4 miles off the beach. We picked up a few dogs but not enough to make the weight we were looking for. Tried a couple more spots, same thing. Ended up on some live bottom a mile or so inshore of C-buoy and loaded the boat. Final tally, gutted, is somewhere north of 250lbs of the spiny little critters. Not a bad day for fishing in January.

Maybe the biggest report we can share with the offshore guys is that, of the 250lbs+ dogfish, we didn't catch a single BSB, pinfish, flounder, etc. Nothing but the dogs. So, if you didn't get out there today, other than the sweat sea breeze and singing sirens, you didn't miss much from a fishing standpoint.

Till next time....
tight lines!
Johnny and Donna

Matthew 4:19
And He saith unto them, Follow me, and I will make you fishers of men.

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